Tag Archives: Examples

12 Great Landing Page Examples You’ll Want to Copy

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Landing pages exist to serve one purpose: getting website visitors to convert to the next stage in the buying journey. Although their purpose is simple enough in theory, actually designing a successful landing page requires some detailed planning and creative testing.

Regardless of what your business is selling or the conversion action you hope to instigate, it’s helpful to get inspired by seeing what other great landing pages look like. And because there’s no one “right” way of doing a landing page, you’ll want to check out examples from lots of different industries for different stages of the buying process.

Want to get inspired? Check out the great landing page examples below. Build and promote landing pages that generate more leads with the help of this  free optimization guide.

Disclaimer: I don’t have access to the analytics for each of these landing pages, so I can’t tell you specifically how well they convert visitors, contacts, leads, and customers. But many of them do follow best practices while also implementing a few new experiments that could give you ideas for your own landing pages. 

12 Great Examples of Landing Page Design

1) Lyft

We love that on Lyft’s landing page, they zero in on their drivers’ main motivation: earning money easily.

We also love that, in addition to the “Apply Now” form, drivers can type their city and the number of hours they might drive for Lyft in a week to calculate how much they’d make. When visitors fill out that information and press “Calculate,” they aren’t taken to a new page. Instead, they see a dollar amount followed by a new call-to-action button to “Apply Now” (which, once clicked, takes drivers up to the form).

By offering these two conversion paths, they’re able to address two different types of people in the conversion path: those who are ready to make the decision now and those who need a little more information before they convert.

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2) The Professional Wingman

Okay, so the whole idea of having a professional wingman to help you find dates and a meaningful relationship is already pretty cool. But when you’re faced with the prospect of hiring one, it also raises questions. How does it work? How much does it cost? Is this really going to help me?

That’s why we love this landing page for Thomas Edwards, the original Professional Wingman himself, which outlines exactly what a complimentary coaching session is going to achieve. Plus, it’s clear that it’s complimentary, thanks to the boldly-colored call-to-action button above the fold.

Once you click that button, you aren’t taken to a new page. Instead, an interstitial form appears right there. And while it does request a lot of information — some of it a bit personal — it also sends the message that The Professional Wingman is going to take this seriously, but only if you do, too.

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3) Muck Rack

This landing page design has it all. It’s visually appealing and interactive, offers scannable yet descriptive headers about Muck Rack’s services, and uses quotes from industry professionals as social proof. Plus, the page is intuitive and easy to navigate.

The cool part about this landing page is that it can appeal to both of Muck Rack’s audiences. The top of the page is split into two, featuring their two different services side by side. Once a visitor moves his or her mouse over either of the “find journalists” or the “build free portfolio” CTAs, a very simple form appears — and that’s important, so as not to distract the user from the task at hand.

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4) Cigital

There are a few things that make this Cigital landing page work. It has simple and relevant imagery. The headline is straightforward and the description of the ebook informs viewers of the specific value they will get by downloading it. There is only one call-to-action — “READ THE EBOOK” — that stands out on the page thanks to a bright yellow CTA button.

The only thing we’d change about this landing page is that we’d remove the navigation bar at the top. They tend to distract visitors and lead them away from the intended action. Not only is this a landing page design best practice, but we’ve also conducted A/B tests that’ve shown removing navigation links from landing pages increases conversion rates.

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5) Khan Academy

The hard part about using your homepage as a landing page is that you have to cater to several different types of audiences. But Khan Academy’s homepage does that very well. This page is clearly designed for three different types of visitors: those who want to learn something, those who want to teach, and parents who are interested in using Khan Academy for their kids. Plus, how motivational is the emblazoned “You can learn anything” text at the top? 

The remainder of the page is designed for viewers who are not completely familiar with Khan Academy. It colorfully and largely spells out the key benefits of using the learning platform — all of which are easy to scan and understand. There’s also a recurring CTA: “Start learning now.” As soon as viewers feel they have enough information, they can click the CTA to get taken back up to the form at the top of the page without having to scroll.

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6) Club W

A little bit of delightful copy can go a long way on your landing page. We love the playful little aside — “(Hint: It’s Wine)” — that Club W included below the header of their corporate gifting landing page. It humanizes the brand and makes them likable, which could have a positive impact on their conversion rate.

The images below that header make a nice use of negative space, showing the user exactly what his or her gift recipient might actually receive, should they choose to gift with Club W. And, of course, there’s that bold call to action — “Email Us”.

The one thing we’d change? The CTA prompts the users email software to open, which drives traffic away from the site and the browser entirely. A form might be more effective here — not only would Club W be able to dictate what information it wants to capture, but also, it would keep the user on-site.

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7) Codecademy

I like this page because it’s simple in both copy and design. The image above the fold is a computer screen displaying an HTML bracket with a blinking cursor — a whimsical, clear visual to accompany the form on the right.

The form itself is simple and only requires an email address, username, password, and a validation that you’re not a robot to create an account. Or, you can just use your Facebook or Google Plus login, shortening the conversion path even further.

For visitors who need more information before creating an account, the landing page also offers a video below the fold that explains their concept and value by way of a real-life success story. Again, this helps make the potentially intimidating world of coding more approachable for beginners.

Those who need even more convincing can continue scrolling for additional testimonials and other forms of social proof.

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8) Poached

I don’t think we’ve ever lived in a time when, culturally, we’ve been so food-obsessed. Poached has turned that into a B2B model with a platform to connect proprietors and culinary talent.

When you visit the homepage, there’s no mystery about what you’re there to do — the giant “Post a job” and “Choose a city” calls to action help with that. And once you click on one of them, you’re taken to a no-frills form to become a member or log in, or a list of jobs in each city. It’s colorful and comprehensive — and, it makes us hungry.

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9) Breather

Here’s another example of clever, delightful design on a landing page. As soon as you visit Breather.com, there’s an instant call to action: indicate where you want to find a space. Plus, it uses location services to figure out where you are, providing instant options nearby.

We love how Breather used simple, to-the-point copy to let the visitor know what the company does, followed immediately by the CTA to select a city. And if you need to scroll down for more information, you can see that Breather played with the microcopy with personality (“no commitment, ever”), reminding us there are real humans behind the design. That brings us a little closer to the brand. The negative space and soothing color scheme are also aligned with the product — essentially, room to breathe.

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10) Startup Institute

Visitors to your website won’t hand over their personal information without knowing what they’re going to get in return. On its landing page, Startup Institute makes abundantly clear what will happen after you apply by listing a Q&A right beside the form. It might prompt some people to say, “They read my mind!”

To avoid hesitancy to fill out a form, use your landing page to set expectations upfront. That clears the air, and can also weed out the people who don’t take your content, product or service seriously.

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11) Edupath

Who is your landing page’s target audience? While most of Edupath’s website content is directed toward students, there are sections dedicated to advising parents on helping their teenagers through college applications and SAT preparation. The landing page below is in one of these sections.

When parents fill out their teenager’s name, email address, and mobile number, a link to download the Edupath app is sent directly to them. The folks at Edupath know students are likely to do something if their parents ask them to — especially if it means they don’t have to surrender their phones.

Plus, it’s an easy, one-click process. This whole conversion path is a clever and helpful way to get the apps on more students’ phones by way of their parents.

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12) Taster’s Club

If there’s anything we enjoy more than a fine whiskey, it’s a whiskey club homepage that makes it easy to either join or learn more about membership. Case in point: Taster’s Club, which immediately serves up those very two CTAs on its landing page — which also happens to be its homepage.

For those to wish to learn more, clicking that CTA will immediately scroll the user down to colorful, image-rich details on what a Taster’s Club membership includes. Keep scrolling, and you get user testimonials.

But clicking the “Join Now” button is where the real fun begins. After doing that, you get to pick your poison — that is, the type of whiskey you like the most — and view the membership or gifting options available for it. Once you make your selections, you’re taken to an easy-to-navigate checkout page to enter your payment information. Good design and ease of use? We’ll drink to that. 

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Want more landing page design inspiration?  Check out some of our favorite HubSpot landing page examples .

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in July 2014 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

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HubSpot Marketing Blog

12 Personalized Email Examples You Can’t Help but Click

If you’re anything like most people, you can probably rattle off 100 different things you’d rather do than dig through your inbox.

It starts to feel like a chore, because what’s in there isn’t very interesting. In fact, only 21% of consumers reported that they’ve received a memorable promotional email in the past two months, according to a study by Litmus

To overcome that, many brands are using email personalization as a strategy for creating more engaging email experiences — ones that feel less like a robot, and more like a friend. Download our free guide here to learn how to personalize your own emails to  generate more opens and clicks.

The best part? Email personalization doesn’t need to be insanely complicated to resonate with recipients. To see what I mean, check out these 12 great email examples that cleverly use personalization.

12 Examples of Email Personalization in Action

1) JetBlue

Oh, JetBlue. You shouldn’t have. 

This anniversary email highlights a creative example of a brand using something as simple as a date to provide a standout experience. Much like a birthday shout out, JetBlue used my colleague’s account creation date to trigger a personalized email to celebrate the fact that they’ve been “emailing for 365 days now.”

If you’re a HubSpot customer, this is an easy email to replicate for your contacts through fixed date or property-based workflows. It allows you to base your workflow on a calendar or contact property date, so you can send anniversary emails, digital birthday cards, renewal reminders, and more. And if your business is sending a high volume of these emails, we also offer the Transactional Email Add-On.

2) Spotify 

Here’s another great personalized email example that leverages a user’s interests to provide a relevant, value-packed message.

The copy in this email is particularly effective because it frames the personalization in a way that makes the recipient feel like they’re being rewarded for their usage. Phrases like “top listener” and “be the first to get access” lend themselves to a sense of exclusivity — making the user feel important. 

The email also closes with a written call-to-action that encourages the recipient to listen to Charles Kelley’s new song  — specifically on Spotify. Again, this push helps to ensure that the user is actively using the streaming service, and therefore continuously reminded of the value. 

3) Amazon 

Last Halloween, HubSpot’s blogging team dressed as the dancing pumpkin man from this viral video. (And, in case you’re wondering, we’ll probably be dressing as a bunch of bananas this year.) But before opting to DIY our own orange masks, my colleague, Lindsay Kolowich, set out on an Amazon search to find us the real deal.

Within just a couple of days, she received this personalized email from Amazon featuring “products similar to ‘full face plastic pumpkin masks’.” (Some of them are quite scary, aren’t they?)

This email serves as a great example of how to use a contact’s search behavior to re-engage them with your company, and hopefully move them closer to a sale. 

4) LinkedIn

Once upon a time, before I worked for HubSpot — practically another lifetime, it feels like — I was about to graduate from business school and actively applying for jobs.

I often used LinkedIn for my search — a business-focused social network that was paying attention the type of listings I responded to. Each day, LinkedIn sent me a roundup jobs it thought would pique my interest.

LinkedIn

What’s interesting about this email is that LinkedIn wasn’t using it to earn my paid business. Rather, LinkedIn seemed to be keeping a close eye, algorithmically, to the locations and type of work I was seeking. While some of the listings were more applicable than others, all of them were clickable.

Did you catch that? Clickable. And even if none of these jobs piqued my interest, I had about 250 classmates who might have considered them, driving even more traffic to LinkedIn’s website.

So think about what’s going to make your content clickable, and how you can use personalized emails to drive traffic to your site. Then, set up workflows that remind subscribers how to continue taking advantage of these specially-tailored messages.

5) The Bowery Presents

I received this email back when I was living in New York address, but it still serves as a great example of how to use location information to provide a customized email experience.

In the email, The Bowery Presents pulled shows from New York venues — where I purchased tickets for many events when I lived there — for artists similar to the ones I saw live.  

The Bowery Presents

And when I finally purchased tickets to see one of these artists in Boston? It re-personalized my emails to let me know about shows here.

Bowery Boston

By making it easy for me to quickly visualize what’s headed to the area and when, The Bowery Presents is able to lower the barrier between me and the point of purchase.

This type of personalization could be extremely beneficial for a company looking to deliver more relevant messages to international leads or existing customers. (For more tips on reaching international audiences, check out this article from our VP of International Operations and Strategy, Nataly Kelly.)

6) Twitter

After following one of her favorite brunch spots on Twitter, my colleague Corey received this email from the social network with suggestions for similar accounts to follow. 

What’s more is that the suggestions were actually super relevant — turns out, a couple of them were just right around the corner from her. (Hello, new grub options.)

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When companies have as much data as Twitter does, they usually go one of two ways with personalization: They totally hit the nail on the head, or they have too much data to sift out what’s important. This is an example of accurately identifying what Corey would actually care about, and delivering it to her.

7) Hawaiian Airlines

There are few places on the planet that I love more than Hawaii. I’m constantly thinking about my next trip there, but for a while, could never quite commit to booking it.

That is, until I received this special birthday email from Hawaiian Airlines. In keeping with the Hawaiian tradition of presenting someone with a lei on his or her birthday, the airline instead chose to present me with 500 bonus miles, just for booking a trip within the next year. Aloha, indeed.

Hawaiian Airlines

There’s more than one noteworthy thing about this email. First, the only reason I received it is because I’m enrolled in the Hawaiian Airlines mileage program, and getting emails like these is just one of the “rewards” of membership. Plus, the airline understands that I joined for a reason — because at some point, I planned to visit Hawaii again.

With that in mind, Hawaiian Airlines used this personalized email to give me an incentive to finally book that trip, with a birthday greeting to boot. That’s a great way for brands to achieve customer reactivation — by using a fixed date, like a birthday or anniversary, to remind people what it was that they loved about your business in the first place. By offering something special from your brand to commemorate the occasion, you’re giving your audience the motivation to take action and making a purchase.

8) HubSpot Academy

There’s a thing about licenses and certifications. They’re valuable. They help you master knowledge and become an expert. Having them makes you look good. But they also have to be kept up-to-date, and unless you’re reminded, letting them expire can be all too easy.

If you have any HubSpot certifications, you know that doesn’t have to be the case. Our Academy team creates personalized emails to let certification-holders know which ones they currently possess, which ones need to be renewed, and which ones might be helpful to add to their credentials.

HubSpot Academy

Eric Peters, the senior growth marketing manager with HubSpot Academy, explained the technology that makes emails like these work. Each certification box in the above email is made “smart,” to show users which certifications are available to them.

“All nine certifications are available to partners. Eight are available to customers, and four to non-customers,” Peters says. “Each one of those certifications has a Smart CTA that appears as a different color, depending on whether the user is actively certified — which means they passed within the last 395 days — expired, or incomplete.” 

“In other words,” he explains, “it’s a bunch of Smart CTAs embedded in a smart rich text box. The CTAs point to the splash page describing the certification.”

(HubSpot Professional and Enterprise customers: You can create Smart CTAs like these in your own emails with your HubSpot CTA tool.)

9) Netflix

Am I the only one that spends more time looking for a movie on Netflix than I do actually watching it?

Aware that its database can be overwhelming, Netflix regularly sends out these personalized emails that suggest movies for its users. (If you want to learn more about the science behind the Netflix algorithms, you can brush up on it here.)

By providing a custom recommendation, Netflix helps ensure that users are actively seeing the value of their subscription. In other words, it keeps them watching, which ultimately keeps them paying. 

This approach could be applied to a number of marketing materials — ebooks, webinars, and blog articles, to name a few. For example, if you find that someone downloaded an ebook on social media tips, you may want to set up a workflow to trigger a follow-up email that suggests they check out your social media guide on SlideShare. 

10) Pinterest

In an effort to keep my colleague Ginny pinning, Pinterest sent her this personalized email. Based off her past activity on the site, the social network provided some suggestions for other topics she may want to explore. (Butter, Lauren Conrad, and cheese — I like your style, Ginny.)

And given that, at the time, she was planning a yellow-themed wedding, I’d say the results were pretty accurate. 

What we love most about the email is its simplicity. It offers up just six topics, which is enough to interest the recipient without overwhelming her. Plus, the copy is quick, friendly, and clear. 

11) WeddingWire

In other wedding-related news, my colleague Ginny also received this email example from WeddingWire, an online marketplace for venues, cakes, dresses, and other wedding-planning items.

While the copy was clever in and of itself, what really struck us was the personalization used in the subject line. After all, your recipients aren’t going to see the content unless you persuade them to click first, right?

By using a witty, custom hashtag —  #GinnysLastHurrah — in the subject line, WeddingWire inspired her to click on the email, check out their tool for creating hashtags, and forward the email to the rest of us. 

If you want to boost the word-of-mouth influence behind your product or service, you should consider how personalization can help propel your message. 

12) Birchbox

Birchbox is a company that’s fixated on personalization in all the right ways — and all it takes is one glance at the header of this email to see why it’s effective.

Birchbox transparently admitted that they took a peek at my colleague Carly’s sample and purchase history before crafting this email. That gave her the sense that what came next would likely be relevant to her — and it was. 

These little, personalized messages always reinforce why Carly continues to subscribe to the Birchbox service — they strengthen her loyalty. 

Let’s Get Personal

With 62% of millennials feeling that online content drives their loyalty to a brand, and 46% of U.S. consumers admitting that they’re more likely to switch providers than they were 10 years ago — it’s clear that fostering loyalty through personalization should be a priority.

It may seem like a big undertaking, but by observing, understanding, and investing in the behavior of your customers, you can help to ensure that they’ll stay customers. So start getting personal — and building loyalty.

Is your company leveraging email personalization? Share your favorite tips below.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in February 2013 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

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HubSpot Marketing Blog

14 of the Best Product Page Design Examples We’ve Ever Seen

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If you look at how product pages take shape across different companies, it’s clear that they run the gamut. Some go for the direct approach, displaying an image of a product and explaining why someone should buy it. Other companies create elaborate pages with moving parts and fancy coded elements.

Of course, some companies fare better than others at creating delightful product pages.

But since we prefer to focus on the positive, we scouted out 14 examples that we find truly admirable. From messaging, to value propositions, to general product promotions, these brands nail these features in a persona-friendly way. Download even more great web page design examples here.

And after checking out these pages, you might want to buy their products, too.

14 Remarkable Product Landing Page Designs

1) Bellroy

Bellroy sells thinner-than-typical wallets. There’s value to that — but what is it, and how do you get the consumer to understand it?

To answer those questions, Bellroy divided its product page into three stages of the buyer’s journey — understanding the problem, how to fix the problem, and how Bellroy can resolve the problem.

There’s even an interactive section that shows how the skinny wallet will fill up in comparison to a different wallet. As users move a slider back and forth along a line, both of the wallets fill up with cards and cash, visually displaying the very problem Bellroy’s skinny wallet solves.

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[Click here to see Bellroy’s full product page.]

2) Wistia

Wistia is a video hosting and analytics company that provides users with detailed video performance metrics. It might sound like a snooze-fest, but let’s dive into what really makes this product page stand apart.

First, we’re presented with five, colorful graphics illustrating their tools’ value propositions. And in case that’s all the user really needed to see, those graphics are followed by two calls-to-action.

But, if you continue scrolling, you’ll see a video with information about Wistia’s capabilities for that video — calls-to-action, email collectors, video heatmaps, and viewing trends.

One of the best ways to explain a visual platform’s features is to demonstrate them on a product page. This one shows users all of Wistia’s features and how they work, day-to-day.

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Click here to see Wistia’s full product page.

3) Square

Square is a mobile transaction company that merchants can use to collect payment from customers — anywhere, any time, as long as they have a compatible phone or tablet.

The product marketing challenge here is to show why Square is an easier alternative than a typical cash register — and its product page displays those reasons in a visually captivating way.

The main headline of each section of this product page has bold, succinct copy: “Small credit card reader, big possibilities.”

The rest of the page is clearly organized headlines — which kind of read like answers to frequently asked questions — plenty of white space, succinct copy, and appropriate images. Anyone looking into each section can understand exactly how Square works at every stage of a transaction.

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[Click here to see Square’s full product page.]

4) Rent the Runway

Some companies — especially in ecommerce — can have up to thousands of product pages. Rent the Runway, an online dress rental company, is one of them.

Rent the Runway has an individual product page for every dress it carries, with all the information a customer could want — images, measurements, fabric, price, and reviews. So what sets them apart? The exceptional detail of the “Stylist Notes” and “Size & Fit” sections.

These details are clearly and carefully curated from stylists and reviewers. They don’t just explain what a dress is made of and how it looks — they cover how it fits on every part of the body, which undergarments should be worn with it, and for which body types it’s best suited. That kind of Information not only delights customers and encourages their trust, but it also makes for a more confident buying decision.

Also, notice how there’s plenty of white space surrounding the product images and description. According to research by ConversionXL, that white space creates a higher perceived value — in this case, price — of the product in the user’s mind.

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[Click here to see Rent the Runway’s full product page.]

5) Coin

Coin is like a credit card, but better — it actually keeps the information from all of your credit cards in one place. In other words, instead of filling your wallet with two credit cards, a debit card, three gift cards, and two rewards cards, you can fill your wallet with one: Coin.

Some product pages depend on text to highlight product differentiation. But Coin invites the viewer to visually consume all of its elements. That starts with a video at the top of the page to show how Coin works — and how cool it is, of course.

But keep scrolling. Coin displays its product positioning and differentiation through a visual journey of the Coin card. Just check out that fun animation — what a great way to represent how a product works.

Coin
[Click here to see Coin’s full product page.]

6) Oreo

If you’ve seen any of Oreo’s marketing, you shouldn’t be surprised they’re on this list. But sometimes, being well known can actually make it harder to create a product page. So how did they do it?

The focus of Oreo’s product page is how these simple, classic cookies can help people unleash their imaginations, dare to wonder, and become generally happier. It features a series of videos, one after another. One is accompanied by the lyrics, “It’s so easy to let your imagination go when you play with Oreo,” paying tribute to the age-old discussion about the “best” way to eat them. The page takes a creative, bold approach to marketing with what might otherwise be thought of as an ordinary snack.

Oreo also took a unique design to this page. Even though the cookies themselves are monochrome, the page is wonderfully colorful, from the videos, to the backgrounds, to the graphics.

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[Click here to see Oreo’s full product page.]

7) Fitbit Charge

When I was assigned this post, I asked a few people for their favorite product page suggestions. I was amazed how many people immediately recommended Fitbit — and after checking out the site, I can see why.

The page starts off with a value proposition — not a list of features. It’s a hero image of people hiking a mountain, who we can imagine are wearing Fitbits, with the copy, “Energize your day.”

As you scroll down the page, it goes through four quick steps explaining how the product works. What’s more, a lot of these are interactive — the section under “Everything you need, all in one place” allows users to hover over different features to see how they appear on Fitbit’s mobile app.

But the page also explains why these features are valuable. For example, one tracks everything you do from walking, to running, to sleeping. Why does that matter? Well, you can have your current records on hand, and try to beat them.

Knowing that users might not remember all of the specifics when they leave the page, Fitbit was sure to focus on how these features will actually make a difference in the visitors’ lives. Well played.

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[Click here for Fitbit Charge’s full product page.]

8) Volkswagen

Volkswagen takes an interactive approach to their product marketing. Instead of listing out all of the features you can have in a car, they walk you through the process of actually building your car. As you go through that process, Volkswagen highlights the different features you could choose, then gives you a preview of what the car will look like and how that will affect the price.

Even though I’m not currently in the market for a new car, I personally had fun tinkering with the different customization features on the page. What color do I want? Do I want premium audio? (Yes.) It’s an interesting way for the brand to eliminate the notorious connotations of “car salesmen,” by allowing users to learn about and select features independently.

Plus, there’s a nifty matchmaking feature that allows you to see which nearby dealerships have the car with all of your preferences in its inventory.

(If you want to see a regular product page, they’ve got that, too.)

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[Click here to see Volkwagen’s full product page.]

9) Seattle Cider

The folks at Seattle Cider claim their cider is “not your standard cider.” Well, neither is the product page. It reads like a story, beginning with attractive, high-definition images of the cider selection, which happen to have really cool label designs. As you hover, an explanation appears of what differentiates Seattle Cider’s products from others, and what makes each variation special.

But my favorite part is what comes next: a really cool, interactive display of how cider is made from start to finish, which plays for users as they scroll. It’s a surprising and delightful user experience that goes above and beyond the typical product page, because it doesn’t just display the products. It shows where they come from, and how.

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[Click here to see Seattle Cider’s full product page.]

10) OfficeSpace Software

OfficeSpace sells facility management software to help folks manage, well, office spaces. Like the name, the product page is very clear and direct.

Each section of this product page is dedicated to a different feature of the software. The headline explains the feature, and the subheadline explains why this feature is important as you evaluate different software.

That makes it easy for prospects to quickly digest what the product offers, but also read more details on its value proposition, if they choose to. And, if someone wants to learn even more about a particular feature, there are clear calls-to-action to do so.

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[Click here to see OfficeSpace’s full product page.]

11) Orangina

This carbonated citrus drink has been around since 1935, and it has exactly four products — original, red orange, light, and tropical. So, how does Orangina keep its product page both current and special?

For one, it’s fun to explore. When you hover your mouse over any of the blocks, the picture or icon animates — the bottles dance around, the orange slices in half, and the thermometer drops. The animated images and bold colors fit in perfectly with the Orangina brand’s bold, fun personality.

Also, you might notice that some of the blocks are actual products, while the others are simply tips and details about their products. If you don’t have a lot of products to sell, consider interspersing them with tips and information about the products you do have available.

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[Click here to see Orangina’s full product page.]

12) Mango Languages

Mango Languages creates “lovable” language-learning experiences for libraries, schools, corporations, government agencies, and individuals. Its homepage has illustrated calls-to-action for each of these buyer personas — from public libraries, to government offices, to individuals who want to learn something. Each of those calls-to-action leads to a different product page that’s colorful, clearly written, and very comprehensive.

Take a look at the example for individuals below. Like every other part of the website, it exudes Mango’s friendly, approachable, and helpful brand personality. The video couldn’t be more delightful. I mean, a guitar-playing mango in a top hat? Yes, please.

As you scroll, you’re greeted with clear value propositions that use playful language that’s true to brand — for example: “Useful stuff. Zero fluff.” Everything about the page says “simple to use,” “fun,” and “effective.”

Mango.gif

[Click here to see Mango’s full product page.]

13) PaletteApp

Like Volkswagen, PaletteApp, a maker of flooring products, took the interactive approach to its product page. It helps make designers’ lives easier by leveraging the world’s largest digital database of architectural products and materials. There are a lot of them — from flooring to countertops — and the goal of the product pages is to make it painless for designers to find and collect the products they like.

Notice below how users can hover their mouse over each product to request a sample, add it to their library, or add it to their personal palette. Options can be filtered by application, price, product type, color, and manufacturer, too, which is important with so many products available. PaletteApp does an impressive job of making it easy to whittle down your choices.

paletteapp.gif

[Click here to see PaletteApp’s full product page.]

14) Minwax

Minwax makes products to help people care for their wood furnishings and surfaces. Riveting, right? But the brand has managed to create a product page that’s not only relevant, but also, helps users quickly and easily find what they’re looking for.

That’s thanks, in part, to the Minwax Product Finder module. It functions like a quiz, asking a series of multiple-choice questions, like “What kind of project is it?” and “What are you looking to do?” Once you answer the questions, the quiz generates recommended products, which includes a handy “Don’t Forget” list with the tools you’ll need to get the job done — things like safety glasses, gloves, and sandpaper. Helpful tips like this go above and beyond a normal ecommerce product page.

MiNWAX.gif

[Click here to see Minwax’s full product page.]

Ready to work on your product page?

So, what have these brands taught us about product pages? Well, we think it boils down to a few must-haves:

  • Make it interesting and fun, especially if you have a less-than-riveting product.
  • Make it easy for visitors to find what they’re looking for.
  • Make it personal. Allow users to “build their own” product, to show them that you can meet their preferences.
  • Make it informative. Without bogging it down in detail, be sure to include the right pieces of information that will show users what sets your products apart.

What other great product pages have you seen, and what makes them great? Share with us in the comments.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in March 2014 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

50 examples of beautiful website design


HubSpot Marketing Blog

16 of the Best Examples of Beautiful Blog Design

beautiful_blog_design-1.png

According to a recent U.K. survey, bloggers have ranked as the third most trustworthy source of information, following only friends and family. That’s right — bloggers are trusted more than celebrities, journalists, brands, and politicians.

But how do you get people to fall in love with your blog in the first place? (Aside from remarkable content, of course.)

Well, just as your website homepage is like the front door to your business, your blog’s design — much like a welcome mat — is the front door to your business blog. Download our full collection of blog design examples here to inspire your own  blog design.

If you’re not attracting people visually, how will you get them to take the next steps to actually read (and, hopefully, subscribe to) your content? Once you’re done creating the quality content, you still have the challenge of presenting it that clearly dictates what your blog is about. Images, text, and links need to be shown off just right — otherwise, readers might abandon your content, if it’s not aesthetically showcased in a way that’s both appealing and easy to follow.

That’s why we’ve compiled some examples of blog homepages to get you on the right track to designing the perfect blog for your readers. Check ’em out.

16 Inspiring Examples of Beautiful Blog Homepage Design

1) Help Scout

Sometimes, the best blog designs are also the simplest. Help Scout, makers of customer service software, uses a unique but minimalist design on its blog that we love — it limits the use of copy and visuals and embraces negative space.

What we particularly like about this blog is its use of featured images for all posts, including a banner one at the top that highlights a recent or particularly popular entry. These icons are set in front of bright, block colors that catch the readers’ eye and signal what the post is about. And it works — everything about this blog’s design says “clean” and “readable.”

Help_Scout_Blog-2.png

2) Microsoft Stories

Full disclosure: We’ve totally gushed over Microsoft’s “Stories” microsite before. We can’t help it — what better way to revitalize an old-school brand than with a blog that boasts beautiful, interactive, and inspiring branded content? Plus, the square layout of these stories is reminiscent of the Microsoft logo, which achieves a valuable brand consistency.

Microsoft Stories is also a prime example of how a business blog can be a major asset for an overall rebrand. In recent years, Microsoft has worked to humanize its brand, largely in response to a rivalry with Apple. The “Stories” microsite has a simple tagline — “Get an inside look at the people, places and ideas that move us.” It’s the softer side of Microsoft, so to speak. 

When you’re trying to convey a certain brand message, your blog can be used to communicate it — both aesthetically, and content-wise.

Microsoft_Stories_Blog.png

3) Pando

An important aspect of a well-designed blog is a consistent color scheme and style — after all, 80% of consumers say that color boosts their recognition of a brand.

It’s interesting to see how color consistency can unify the more diversified elements of design. Pando, a blog that explores the startup cycle, incorporates blue tones in several sections of its site — the background, highlight bars, and certain areas of text. But it also uses several different fonts — all of which manage to look seamless together, when tied together by a cohesive color scheme.

Pando_Blog.png

4) Design Milk

Design Milk, an online contemporary design outlet, uses a very simple layout to highlight its posts. The sidebar to the right — which remains visible when a blog post is opened to read — is perfect for showcasing thumbnail images for new articles. That’s an internal link strategy, which helps to encourage readers to remain on the site longer.

The social icons at the top are a pleasant addition to the overall look and feel of the site — they’re easy to spot, and make it easy to share Design Milk’s content. (And to learn more about adding social buttons to your blog, check out this post.)

Design Milk Blog.png

5) Fubiz

Fubiz, an art and design blog, is an example of a really sleek design that also includes some cool personalization.

Near the top of the blog’s homepage, readers can side-scroll through “highlighted” posts. Below that is the Creativity Finder, where visitors can select their chosen personas — from “Art Lover” to “Freelance” — location, and the type of content they’re looking for. From there, readers can browse content specifically catered to them. 

We can’t help but love the header image, too. It uses something called “blue mind” psychology, which has found that the sight of open water can naturally draw us in. By using it in a design scheme, Fubiz is able to visually attract visitors to its content.

Fubiz blog.png

6) Webdesigner Depot

With a name like “Webdesigner Depot,” it’s no wonder that this design news site is visually appealing.

One thing that we particularly like is the way Webdesigner Depot has incorporated social sharing icons on each individual post. While we of course suggest actually reading each piece, having those links readily available helps visitors immediately share a headline they find interesting. And check out those navigation arrows on the right — never before has it been so easy to scroll to the top or bottom of a page.

What’s more, the color scheme, background, and fonts are all consistent — which keeps this blog looking professional, but still distinct from the basic blog templates we might be used to seeing.

Webdesigner Depot Blog.png

7) Mashable

I mean, just look at that header image. The bold colors, the wiring overlay, the gripping pupil and the contrasting text. It absolutely catches the reader’s eye — no pun intended.

Mashable breaks its content into three noticeable sections on the homepage: New posts are listed on the left in the smallest sized thumbnails. “What’s Rising” posts are displayed in the center column as large thumbnails, and the “What’s Hot” posts are shown to the right, also as large thumbnails. This three-pronged approach to displaying content can help readers decide which kind of news matters to them the most — the attention-grabbing top story, or other posts that are currently trending.

Plus, we like that the number of shares is displayed in each post preview — that’s a great form of social proof.

Mashable Homepage.png

8) Brit + Co

Everything about the Brit + Co homepage says “clean,” “warm,” and “welcoming.” It’s free of clutter, making the content more digestible, and the layout is extremely organized.

We dig the seasonality of the site, too. I mean, avocado jack-o’-lanterns on the dawn of October? Adorable, and replete with a colorful, fun photo to illustrate the story’s content.

The subtle “trending” header also serves as a nice way to promote popular content, without being too in-you-face about it. Plus, with such great visuals, we took note of the nod to Pinterest — that icon is important to include when your blog incorporates attractive imagery.

Brit+Co Blog.png

9) Tesco Living

We love the colorful, consistent design of Tesco Living, the blog site of British grocery chain Tesco. 

Remember how we keep harping away at brand consistency? Check out the rhombus-like designs in the top banner — that reflects the same ones that appear in Tesco’s logo.

What Tesco Living has achieved is a great balance of simplicity and boldness. The layout is extremely minimal, but it isn’t dull. Warm and welcoming shades underscore each content category, and the photos add dashes of colors throughout the site. It’s a great example of how the right imagery can achieve an appealing “less-is-more” appearance, especially if that fits in with your overall brand concept.

TescoBlog.png

10) Crew

Crew Backstage, the blog of the Crew platform for designers and developers, has a fabulously minimalist blog design, but quiet a unique one.

Notice that, above the fold, it features one blog post with a large title, subtitle, and call-to-action to read more.

To the left, there’s an equally minimalist call-to-action that makes it easy for readers to connect with Crew, or learn more. Plus, there’s that consistency again — everything above the fold is the same shade of blue, which has been shown to invoke brand trust.

Crew Backstage Blog.png

11) Innocent Drinks

Not only are the folks at Innocent Drinks great copywriters, but the design of its blog is also a great reminder that blog designs don’t have to get super fancy.

Notice how the logo — displayed in the upper left — is simple, cartoonish, and almost delightfully child-like. It works for Innocent Drinks (hint: childhood innocence), and that brand presence is maintained throughout the company’s blog.

The colorful fonts, for example, match the logo and stay in line with the brand’s casual, playful voice. We also like the easily-navigable archive links on the left, which are complemented by the geometric social sharing buttons on the right.

Innocent Drinks Blog.png

12) 500px

Much like Crew, the photography blog, 500px, leads with one featured article and a big, bold, high-definition photo to draw the reader in. That makes is pretty clear what the blog is about — it boasts valuable content on photography with gripping photography.

Plus, how cool is it that the social links are right there, obviously displayed above the fold? They keep readers engaged with the content, and make it easy to share the photography — and, content with images is up to three times as likely to be shared on social media.

500px Blog.png

13) BarkPost

It’s no secret that we kind of like dogs here at HubSpot. So when a blog dedicated to life as a dog owner came across our radar, it got our attention.

BarkPost, the blog of canine subscription box company BarkBox, is a great example of design for a number of reasons. First, look how easy it is to subscribe — the call to action is right there, above the featured content. The social share icons are easily noticeable, too — and, of course, all in the brand-matching, trustworthy blue.

We also like that BarkPost draws attention to its sister companies, all of which are owned under the Bark & Co portfolio of brands. But at the same time, the blog doesn’t hock its own products — rather, it serves as an informational resource to dog parents and lovers alike.

BarkPost Blog.png

14) Goodwill Industries International

Who says nonprofit organizations can’t blog? Nay, they should — and Goodwill’s clean, colorful navigation (again — the trustworthy blue) draw the reader to the important elements of this blog.

The posts are also neatly positioned and easily accessible to readers. And, visitors can pick the type of information that matters to them the most by choosing a topic from the drop-down menu on the top right.

Finally, we love that there’s a collaborative call to action in the introductory text that invites readers to contribute content to the Goodwill blog. After all, the organizations services have reached 37 million people — here’s a way for them to share their stories, or invite donors to write about why they chose to support Goodwill.

Goodwill Blog.png

15) charity: water

Keeping the nonprofit blogging train going is charity: water, which makes excellent use of high-quality photography.

Recently, the organization redesigned its blog with a lengthy post dedicated to its 10-year anniversary. Using that opportunity to share its impact over the past decade, chartiy: water maintained a simplistic design with concise text and bright images from the anniversary event.

Plus, there’s a clear CTA to donate at the top of the page. Placing that above a story about charity: water’s impact is a double-edged sword, by both inspiring people to contribute to the cause while making it easy to do so.

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16) Johnny Cupcakes

To clear up any confusion, Johnny Cupcakes doesn’t actually make cupcakes. It makes clothing. But the company has done a great job of playing up its brand’s association with baked goods — its blog uses the subdomain “kitchen.”

Plus, the folks at Johnny Cupcakes know a thing or two about brand consistency across channels. Its blog’s simple color scheme and matching fonts help to create a unified user experience from the shop to general content, all the while throwing in bold, colorful images to catch readers’ attention.

Also, visit the website and have a scroll — we think it’s pretty cool how the background images vary, but stay positionally static for each entry.

Johnny Cupcakes Blog.png

Which other blogs have excellent homepage designs? Share more inspiration with us in the comments.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in February 2013 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

download 47 examples of beautiful blog design

  download 47 examples of beautiful blog design


HubSpot Marketing Blog

How to ‘Un-Stock’ Your Photography: 8 Examples That’ll Change the Way You Choose Photos

Unstock_Your_Photography.jpeg

With 46% of marketers reporting that photography is critical to their current marketing and storytelling strategies, it should come as no surprise that quality photos are in high demand.

Trouble is, most commercially available photos on the internet were taken to visualize broad overall concepts rather than concrete messages. That means they can be used in all sorts of campaigns … but also end up looking generic.

Think of all the photos of smiling receptionists and perfectly suited business leaders you’ve come across. These images may compete for attention, but often fail to register, simply because your customers can’t identify with them. Download the free stock photos you've been searching for here. 

As a marketer, you can cut through the noise by using images that more closely relate to your audience. It’s what we call “real photography” here at EyeEm: Unique captures, delightful moments, and surprising perspectives. Images that are more concrete will resonate with audiences much more powerfully since they show real life rather than staged situations.

To visualize what we mean, we put together a handful of generic images alongside a ‘real’ counterpart sourced from our community of photographers. The proof is in the pictures, but we’ll let you see for yourself …

8 Examples of Authentic Imagery For Your Campaigns

1) Business

When it comes to business-related photos, there’s no shortage of clichés. Rather than deciding on an overly clean, generic image like the one below of the woman holding an “open” sign, dig deeper for something more authentic — something that tells a story.

You’ll notice that our suggestion ties in a more personal side of business by highlighting two people working together on a project. You can see the emotion in the woman’s face, as she uses her hands to explain something to her coworker in a seemingly authentic exchange. 

Do This:

Business_RelationshIp_EyeEm.png

Source: Sebastian Kopp via EyeEm

Not This:

Business_Stock.png

Source: Pexels

2) Technology

Technology is notoriously hard to visualize, since a concept like “connectivity” is quite abstract. Old-school stock photography usually puts people next to the tech to achieve that connection, but the results are clumsy and constructed. Or worse, they add in a weird futuristic digital overlay like the image below.

Our suggestion is inspired by contemporary social media culture — and it’s more recognizable. It also features soft focus, natural lighting, and it shows a person truly interacting with the technology.

Do This:

Real_Tech.png

Source: Moritz Otto via EyeEm

Not This:

Screen_Shot_2016-08-22_at_9.07.04_AM.png

Source: 123rf.com

3) Travel

Let’s be honest: When we the last time you went on vacation hoping to come home with a suitcase full of sand? In many cases, travel photos are just plain corny, and they lack the excitement and sense of wonder that comes with exploring new places.

These days, customers’ attention can much more effectively be captured by showing the actual experience of travel, as depicted by our suggestion below. The shot shows the view from a window on an airplane. It captures that thrilling feeling of embarking on a trip — a feeling that many people can easily relate to.

Do This:

Travel_EyeEm_Photo.png

Source: Dina Alfasi via EyeEm

Not This:

Vacation_123rf.png

Souce: 123rf.com

4) Happiness

According to one study, pictures with smiling faces can positively impact conversions. Trouble is, while picturing happiness with a simple smile might have worked in the past, it has long become a tired cliché.

While the image of the group of people smiling in brightly colored shirts feels forced, our suggestion reads more natural, as it radiates a positive emotion while including an interesting element of movement. The image looks like a snapshot, taken in a genuine moment of fun and togetherness.

Do This:

Screen_Shot_2016-08-19_at_12.56.02_PM.png

Source: Sasha Dudkina via EyeEm

Not This:

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Source: 123rf.com

5) Office

Representing an office by the tools one might (or might not) use there looks incredibly staged. It’s better to show context.

In this case, the image we suggested shows a creative space of a freelancer, with a pleasing color palette to underline the tranquility and focus of the workplace. 

Do This:

Office_Environment.png

Source: @dersash via EyeEm

Not This:

Office_Stock.jpg

Source: Pexels

6) Phone

Most images of phones show people awkwardly handling them, presenting their devices in a way nobody in real life would. Exhibit A: The image below of a young girl holding up her phone with a blank screen. 

Now, notice how our suggestion sets highlights the phone without feeling forced or cheesy. The person in the image is shown using the phone in a really natural way, and it’s easy to identify with — after all, who doesn’t love taking photos of their pets?

Do This:

Phone_EyeEm_Photo.png

Source: Markus Spiering via EyeEm

Not This:

Phone_girl.jpeg

Source: Pexels

7) Productivity

Being productive isn’t about doing many things at once, as the photo on the left suggests — but about focus and a clear sense of what matters. (Check out this free guide for tips on how to be more productive.)

While the stock photo below is just plain creepy, our suggestion shows a woman at work, with her focus being underlined by the headphone she wears. It also uses much softer, natural light to remind the viewer how common this activity is.

Do This:

Productivity_EyeEm.png

Source: @jedrzej via EyeEm

Not This:

Productivity_Stock.png

Source: 123rf.com

8) Leadership

Leadership is all about building trust and establishing credibility. Unfortunately, leadership-inspired photos often miss the mark.

The photo below portrays an artificial and thereby very conventional idea of what leadership looks like. To combat that, we choose an image that while more loosely related to the idea, manages to demonstrate the emotive aspect of leading a team.

Do This:

Leadership_Photo.png

Source: Inbal via EyeEm

Not This:

Leadership_Stock.png

Source: 123rf.com

What are you best tips for unstocking your stock photography? Share them with us in the comments below.

80 royalty-free stock photos


HubSpot Marketing Blog

Digital Newsletters as Content Marketing: Pros, Cons, Best Practices and Award Winning Examples

Digital NewslettersIt seems fitting to discuss digital newsletters during the month of October, since the birth of email harkens back 40 years ago this month.

Love it, hate it or tolerate it, without email marketing, digital marketers would have been responsible for the destruction of many, many more trees without it!

Digital newsletters are scheduled, recurring messages from companies to a list of subscribers that usually has a web page counterpart or archive which represents a specific type of content.

In contrast, many Email marketing efforts can include automated messages triggered by an auto-responder, e-blasts to a rented list or a list shared by a complementary business, or as part of a drip campaign run through a marketing automation platform.

Like other smart content marketing tactics, digital newsletters tend to follow a consistent editorial format directed to specific customer segments. Newsletters are often used to build and maintain strong relationships with prospects, customers and clients by providing useful tips, information and company news.

You can find TopRank’s digital newsletter here.

A winning newsletter design incorporates a variety of visuals and smart copywriting, which are important elements that contribute to a company’s overall impression and brand message. TopRank’s experience with marketing automation and cross-channel promotion gives us a unique perspective on how best to utilize both email marketing and digital newsletters, depending on your business goals.

A study by the Nielsen Norman Group suggests that readers become emotionally attached to e-newsletters and look forward to receiving them, provided they are timely and informative.

Many digital newsletters follow a tried and true format for content creation:

  1. News: Relevant business news or even industry news in order to keep your audience up to date
  2. Educational content: Emails that provide your recipients with content that discusses new concepts and helps expand their knowledge on a certain subject
  3. Reviews: Review useful sources that you assume or know your audience can benefit from
  4. Top Tips: Create a series of useful tips about your product or service

Pros

  • Timely. Digital communication is hands-down the timelier format for news, updates and announcements.
  • Cost-effective. The savings on printing and postage when compared to the print version are obvious.
  • Searchable and sharable. Because a digital newsletter represents a web document, it’s a searchable piece of content and can be optimized. Although search engines can read PDF documents, it would be even more effective if an HTML page were created, increasing its ‘crawlability’ and ‘shareability.’ (At a minimum, fill in the Document Properties found by right-clicking the PDF.)
  • Cross linking. Linking to other relevant internal pages as well as related informational sites or articles of interest enrich the reader’s experience and regard for your company and its communications. Your digital archive also represents evergreen content, increasing the chance that it will drive online traffic and the possibility of gaining new subscribers.
  • Thought leadership. Think pieces and trend analysis delivered on a regular basis can position your company as an industry expert sharing its know-how (B2B) or establishing your brand as a trend setter (B2C).

Cons

  • Volatile communications environment. With the continual blurring of work and personal life, your digital newsletter hits the recipient’s inbox accompanied by a jumble of spam, other commercial email and inter-office exchanges. Even recipients who have opted-in to receiving your newsletter may likely delete it after a brief viewing.
  • Strain on resources. Depending on the quality and ambitions of your digital newsletter, outside costs of researching, writing and designing it may be comparable to a printed piece.
  • Mobile usability. New research finds improved usability metrics for subscribing to newsletters, but problems with reading them on mobile devices.
  • Budget and timeline. Because digital and traditional marketing techniques are merging, it’s increasingly difficult to manage and fund digital newsletters on their own. Getting budget approval to publish a quality digital newsletter may mean poaching another department’s budget or sharing internal resources, slowing down deliverables.

What the Experts Are Saying:

“Content is a key component of email marketing for lead nurturing and providing prospects with information about products, services and news about the company and industry. At the same time, email marketing is an essential part of content marketing in getting that content in front of prospects and customers.” Chris Baggott, Chairman and co-founder, Compendium, MarketingSherpa

“We’ve moved from personalization to individualization. It used to be enough to simply add ‘Dear Joe’ in the body of an email. Now, marketers need to change the message and the offer based on the customer’s needs, brand awareness and email interactions.” Sheryl Pattek, VP-principal analyst, Forrester Research.

Vertical Response

Award Winning Digital Newsletter

Who better than an application service provider to win for Best Email Online Newsletter Campaign judged by the Web Marketing Association? In June 2011, this self-service email solutions provider completely revamped their VR Buzz newsletter strategy.

Getting it Right

  • Invested in a completely redesigned newsletter to reflect their new branding
  • Created compelling content and visual design, ensuring consistency across all channels
  • Produced multiple versions based on where the subscriber was in the marketing life cycle

This effort resulted in a substantial increase in engagement, with open rates in the 40 to 45 percent range and click-through rates in the 3 to 10 percent range.

Dominion Credit Union

Engaging Customers with Digital Newsletter

Winning the award for Electronic Marketing from the Marketing Association of Credit Unions and an award of merit from CUES Golden Mirror Awards™ who honor imaginative marketing efforts from around the credit union world, it just goes to show that generating buzz can come in small packages. This is a true digital newsletter created in PDF format for members to revisit on the website at their convenience.

Getting it Right

  • Newsletter archive link hosted on their website home page, which helps with SEO
  • Included relevant news to its member, featuring their new mobile solutions in the headline
  • Educated members about current market interest rates
  • Featured tips on how to save money during the upcoming holiday season

Digital Newsletters serve an incredibly useful function as a content marketing tactic. Reader segmentation helps newsletter editorial align with the specific interests of subscribers, creating a win, win content marketing experience for brands and readers alike. Whether reader lists are fed by brand social communities and networks or other company online marketing, digital newsletters help instill confidence and trust that guides prospects along the sales cycle from consideration to purchase and beyond through retention and advocacy.

If you liked this post, be sure to read about our full list of content marketing tactics.

Photo credit: Shutterstock


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© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2013. | Digital Newsletters as Content Marketing: Pros, Cons, Best Practices and Award Winning Examples | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Digital Newsletters as Content Marketing: Pros, Cons, Best Practices and Award Winning Examples appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Email Marketing – Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®

12 of the Best ‘Contact Us’ Page Examples You’ll Want to Copy

best-contact-us-page-examples.jpeg

When you think of great website design, you probably think about a website’s homepage, or their blog, or their product pages.

But what about a website’s ‘Contact Us’ page?

Far too many website designers put contact pages near the bottom of their priority list in terms of copywriting and design. Think about how many contact pages you’ve stumbled upon that look like they were built in the 1990s, even if the rest of the website is beautiful and updated.

That, my friends, is a huge mistake. Your ‘Contact Us’ page is one of the top four most important pages on your website. For most companies, it’s typically one of the most-visited site pages.

So, what do great ‘Contact Us’ pages look like?

Typically, the best contact pages …

  • Explain why someone should contact them, and describe how they can help solve their visitors’ problems.
  • Include an email and phone number so visitors can quickly find the right information.
  • Include a short form using fields that’ll help the business understand who’s contacting them.
  • Include a call-to-action to keep people on their website — and provide them with another option if they don’t want to complete the form.
  • Showcase the company’s thought leadership, whether that’s by including a list of recent blog posts or articles about the company in the press.
  • Link to active social media accounts like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn to give visitors a way to engage with the business.
  • Redirect to a thank-you page that explains when and how you’ll be contacting them.

Ready to get inspired? Below, we’ve curated 12 examples of some of the best ‘Contact Us’ pages out there. Check ’em out — and think about how you can incorporate some of these ideas into your own contact page design. (To browse more ‘Contact Us’ pages, check out Crayon’s ongoing collection of contact page designs here.)

12 of the Best ‘Contact Us’ Page Examples

1) Tune

There’s a lot going well for Tune’s contact page: the beautiful design, the calls-to-action, the clearly displayed contact information, and the form below the fold for visitors who want to get in touch with specific inquiries.

What I love the most about their page, though, is how welcoming they are. With copy like “We’re Here to Help!” and “Reach out to us anytime and we’ll happily answer your questions,” it makes visitors feel like they’re being taken care of. Many business’ contact pages are rather cold — but the more friendly you make your page’s copy, the better you’ll make your visitors feel. After all, you should want them to contact you so you can help them and start building a relationship.

tune-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

2) Achieve3000

Like many businesses out there, Achieve300 has a lot of different types of people visiting their website — and what these people want to contact them about can vary widely. That’s why they’ve decided to go deeper than the one-size-fits-all approach.

Below that nice hero image and a few words explaining what visitors will get when they contact them, you’ll find three options: You can request a demo, you can reach out to a sales rep, or you can get in touch with customer support. Each one of these options leads to a separate landing page, like the one I’ve included below this screenshot. What a great way to cater to the most common needs of your various web visitors.

achieve3000-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

Here’s the landing page form made specifically for customer support inquiries:

achieve3000-customer-support-contact-page.png

3) Choice Screening

Hands down, the best thing about Choice Screening’s ‘Contact Us’ page is their copy. It doesn’t get much better than this — all starting with that concise, delightful “Talk to a Human” header.

Following all that great copy is a well-organized page with contact information including emails for every different department, followed by a form. The form’s a little lengthy for most businesses, but for a business that runs background checks of all kinds, the form fields are likely necessary to help them organize all their inquiries.

When considering how long your own forms should be, think about whether you’d rather have more inquiries coming in, or higher quality inquiries coming in. As long as you have other, easier avenues for folks to contact you, a longer form can be OK for some businesses.

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[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

4) Atlas 1031 Exchange

At first glance, Atlas 2031 Exchange’s contact page doesn’t have the sexiest of designs. But when you look closely, you’ll realize that it has every single aspect of a great ‘Contact Us’ page — and that starts with functionality.

The page explains thoroughly how responsive they are to questions: “We are incredibly responsive to your requests and value your questions.” Then they actually list out what people will get when they ask a question, including a promise for a short response time of 12 hours or fewer. The page also includes easy-to-read contact information, social media buttons, links to offers, and even a list of recently published blog posts. Well done.

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[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

5) Morroni

Let’s be honest … these days, most people would much rather fill out a form than get on the phone and talk to someone. When choosing what to ask people in your forms, make sure you choose ones that’ll help your specific business understand the person contacting you — and even help you qualify them as a potential lead.

Of course, some people do like picking up the phone … hence the delightful quip before the phone number. We also like Morroni’s challenge-response test to figure out whether visitors are human: “How’s your math? 2+6 = ?.”

morroni-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

6) Dubsat

“How can we help you?”

That’s a classic customer service question — and if you think about it, isn’t a contact page kind of like a place to offer great customer service?

That’s how the folks at Dubsat frame their contact page. Below the nice hero image is that simple question, followed by a dropdown menu to help personalize the experience. If visitors choose to talk to sales, they’ll see one form show up below the fold. If they choose to get support for one of Dubsat’s specific services, they’ll see another one show up.

They also show their general contact information in a fun way, too. Keep scrolling and you’ll find a visual list of the cities where they have locations. Hover your mouse over those cities, and the image changes to that location on a map, along with all the necessary contact information. Very beautifully and cleverly designed.

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Here’s what the whole page looks like:

dubsat-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

7) Pixpa

You’d be surprised how many ‘Contact Us’ pages don’t include a call-to-action. Although the main purpose of your contact page is to help people get in touch with your company, there’ll always be folks who land on the page and don’t want to fill out the form. That’s where a little secondary CTA can fit in nicely.

It can be as simple as a button leading to your blog. Or, it can lead people to demo your product, download a how-to guide, or watch a video. The folks over at Pixpa chose to add a CTA at the bottom of their ‘Contact Us’ page for a free trial. That way, they’re providing value to the folks who land on the page and really just want to talk to a sales rep directly.

pixpa-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

8) PeopleMetrics

Sometimes, the simplest approach is the best approach. PeopleMetrics’ contact page is clean, well written, and does exactly what it’s supposed to do. They know that most of the people who land on their contact page are scanning for the easiest and best way to get in touch, so they didn’t let any heavy design get in the way.

To make people’s lives even easier, they let you use your Facebook or Google Apps login, shortening the conversion path even further. Plus, we love how conversational and fun the copy is: “Feeling formal? Then fill this out and we’ll get back to you.”

peoplemetrics-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

9) Legalia

Here’s another contact page with a clean, functional design. All the information you need to know, including a short form, is consolidated into a smaller space that doesn’t feel crowded. One way they accomplish this is by changing those large images of the building into maps of the locations — which you can do by clicking the “voir le plan” (“view the map”) button below the address.

legalia-voir-le-plan-button.gif

I’d also like to point out a small but important detail for businesses who have international customers. Check out how Legalia included the prefix for their country’s code when listing their contact phone number. Many people overlook this if they aren’t used to dialing international prefixes themselves, but it’s really helpful for your international colleagues and clients to have it right on there. Here’s a list of country codes if you don’t know yours.

And here’s what the whole page looks like:

legalia-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

10) Elluminati

The folks at Elluminati focus their page on location, starting with the hero image at the top — which is actually an embedded Google Map of their location. Users can click on the map, zoom in and out, and search for directions from the Google Maps app right from that embedded map — which is helpful for everyone, including mobile users.

And while white text can be a bit jarring in some cases, it works well against the eye-catching, block color background. We also love the more subtle, very smooth-looking design elements they’ve included, like the social media buttons that fill in with color when you hover your mouse.

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Here’s what the whole thing looks like:

elluminati-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

11) Weifield Group Contracting

With the continuing rise of mobile web browsing and Google heavily favoring mobile-friendly websites on their search engine results pages, it’s important that all pages on your website — including your ‘Contact Us’ page — are mobile-friendly.

This includes simplifying your navigation, keeping forms short and sweet, including large CTA buttons that are easily tappable with a thumb, and large form fields that make it easy for folks to fill it out on their mobile devices instead of having to pinch and zoom.

The Weifield Group’s contact page is a great example of one that is mobile-friendly and responsive. Check out the desktop version of their contact page first, followed by their contact page on mobile — and note how they’ve optimized every part of their page for mobile. The text is large, the form fields are easy to fill out, and their CTA button is large and easily tappable, making for a much more seamless mobile experience.

Here’s the desktop version:

weifield-group-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

And here’s the mobile version:

wefield-group-contact-us-mobile-1.png weifield-group-contact-us-mobile-2.png

HubSpot Customers: If your website is on the Content Optimization System (COS), then your site is already mobile-friendly from a technical point of view. The HubSpot COS uses responsive design to adapt to any mobile device and fully passes the sniff test on Google’s new algorithm.

12) Survicate

Survicate’s contact page is another example of a beautifully simple layout combined with friendly, welcoming copy. I love the subheader below the fold and just above the form, which reads: “Let’s talk about your project.” That kind of conversational, colloquial language is exactly the kind of copy that makes visitors feel closer to a brand.

The form itself is simple, with large form fields and CTA buttons — making it very mobile-friendly. Below that, they’ve laid out all the typical contact information — office address, phone number, email, hours of operation, etc. — in a way that’s easy to read and scan.

Finally, I love that their icons and primary CTA reflect the same color yellow as their logo. All of these simple touches make for a clean, visually appealing design.

survicate-contact-us-page.png

[View the full ‘Contact Us’ page here.]

So there you have it: a list of some of the best ‘Contact Us’ pages out there. Take a look at your business’ contact page and see how it stacks up — or if there are any changes you can make to give your site visitors a better, easier, and more enjoyable experience.

Which great ‘Contact Us’ pages have you found that are worth adding to this list? Share with us in the comments below.

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