Monthly Archives: May 2017

Soulmates.ai launches to help brands find compatible influencers using AI


Influencer marketing is increasing in popularity, but the question of who to engage with raises an interesting quandary.

Brands are finding that employing celebrities and mega-connectors comes with a high risk, and it doesn’t necessarily translate into a reasonable return. These placements also tend to be “one and done” — not a relationship that builds and grows over time. Micro influencers, on the other hand, are often performing better than celebrities overall, but it is hard to manage them at scale, or even find the right people to partner with in the first place.

Today, the Ayzenburg Group has launched its new AI-powered platform, Soulmates.ai, which is designed to help solve this tricky problem. The fascinating thing? It is being developed in conjunction with Dr. J. Galen Buckwalter Ph.D., the former vice president of research and development of Eharmony.com.

In short, the solution is attempting to match your brand with suitable influencers using multiple signs of compatibility.

Soulmates.ai uses artificial intelligence to read, analyze, understand, and categorize public social media messages, looking for people who have both reach and relevance but who also are already advocates for your brand. In essence, it helps you to find micro influencers who already have some resonance with your brand, at scale.

“When brands learn more about their own identity, it’s thrilling,” Eric Burgess, VP of product at Ayzenberg Group, told me. “Capturing the perspectives of like-minded creators can open the value of their products in new ways. They can collaborate on content that will delight the audiences that are organically targeted to receive it.”

Combining natural language processing with a contextualization engine and psychometric analysis, it grades conversations, identifies risks, and ultimately pairs brands with the influencers that are most likely to fit their personality.

So how does it work?

You start by typing in a keyword, username, or hashtag. Terms can be combined, so it is easy — for example — to ask Soulmates.ai to search for influencers who use keywords or hashtags in a particular geographical area.

Once the search has completed, you are presented with a broad range of filters to help narrow down the list of influencers to those you would want to work with. You can decide which channels to focus on, such as Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook. There is a wide range of personality filters too, such as choosing how extroverted, conscientious, agreeable, open, and even neurotic the influencer is, according to the AI’s interpretation of their public social media messages.

The resulting list shows the influencers that match your preferences: their profile, their traits, and their latest posts. From there, you can visit their profile. That’s where the Soulmates.irm browser plugin comes into play. This companion solution lets you add the influencer to a campaign directly from the influencer’s social media account. Once inside Soulmates.irm — the “IRM” here stands for “influencer relationship manager” — you can build a list of influencers and manage everything from approval through to contact, contract negotiation through to production.

Soulmates.ai, and the companion Soulmates.irm, are both available from today. IRM has a free base version with upgrades to add functionality, including access to Soulmates.ai. Soulmates.ai itself has enterprise pricing tailored to each client’s use.

Social – VentureBeat

5 types of rest every creative should adopt


There’s a pervasive idea out there that life and creativity are a zero-sum game. Indulge one, destroy the other. Or, as designer Stefan Sagmeister once wrote in a mural of coins across a plaza in Amsterdam: “Obsessions make my life worse and my work better.” But as anyone who has ever experienced it knows, there comes a point when obsession makes your work worse too. Burnout can be creatively lethal. As Sagmeister explains in his TED talk, “The Power of Time Off”: There comes a point when you need to step away. But it can be very hard for for…

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Is VR The Future of Filmmaking?


The question of how Virtual Reality will transform creative industries such as Film is a big one, but Cannes certainly seemed like an appropriate place to tackle it. So in between attending red carpet screenings, gawking at mega yachts and indulging in some celebrity spotting (Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell and Mads Mikkelsen all in one day!) I attended a series of talks and panels hosted by HP, most of which revolved around the interplay between technology and creativity, with VR being a hot topic. “Believe me, when we are looking at VR today we are looking at the punch cards…

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Many Uber and Lyft riders are ditching their own cars


(Reuters) — Wally Nowinski got his first car when he turned 16 in Michigan, the home of the U.S. auto industry. But after two years of living in New York City, he sold his wheels, using ride services, carsharing and bike sharing to get around.

“My mom didn’t think I could do it. She thought I would buy a new car in six months,” he said. But that was more than a year ago, and his car budget of $ 820 per month fell to $ 250 for carsharing and ride services last year. “I take Uber like pretty frivolously,” he said.

Nowinski, 32, is not alone.

Nearly a quarter of American adults sold or traded in a vehicle in the last 12 months, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll published on Thursday, with most getting another car. But 9 percent of that group turned to ride services like Lyft Inc and Uber Technologies Inc as their main way to get around.

About the same percentages said they planned to dispose of cars and turn to ride services in the upcoming 12 months.

Though a small percentage, the figure of people switching to ride services could be early evidence that more consumers believe that ride sharing can replace vehicle ownership.

Automakers could see a new market in ride services drivers and believe the fast adoption of ride service technology bodes well for self-driving car technology, a big area of investment for many companies, said auto analyst Alan Baum.

It is not clear whether ride service drivers, who rack up vehicle miles and are likely to buy new cars relatively frequently, will make up for any long term drop in personal car ownership.

But Lyft Director of Transportation Policy Emily Castor called the survey ‘early evidence’ that its vision of a world where personal car ownership was unnecessary was beginning to take hold.

“What we’ve seen anecdotally aligns with what you’ve found,” said Uber Head of Transportation Policy and Research Andrew Salzberg.

The survey was the first on the subject by Reuters/Ipsos, so it was not possible to tell whether the move to ride services from car ownership is accelerating, and respondents were not asked whether they gave up a car because of ride services.

The survey showed that 39 percent of Americans had used rides services and that 27 percent of that group did so at least several times per week.

University of California, Berkeley researcher Susan Shaheen said the results on the move to ride services was in line with her 2016 study of a one-way carsharing service, which found a small portion of customers sold a vehicle due to carsharing. She noted, however, that the Reuters/Ipsos survey did not address carsharing or whether people who did not own cars would avoid buying one because of ride services.

Transportation consultant Bruce Schaller said that most of the move to ride sharing probably was explained by factors such as moving in and out of cities and employment changes. Still, he said, “It’s not the predominant trend, but there are a significant number of people who have changed their lifestyle, if you will, and are now relying much more on ride services than their own car.” That was especially true of people who used many sharing services, such as ride share, car share and bike share.

Auto companies say they are getting ready for changes in technology, including expanded demand for ride services and, eventually, self-driving vehicles. “Those are the factors that are driving our move into being both an auto and a mobility company,” said Ford spokesman Alan Hall.

The Reuters/Ipsos U.S. poll was conducted online in English April 5-11. It gathered responses from 584 people who said they disposed of their personal vehicle within the last 12 months and 566 people who said they planned to get rid of their personal vehicles in the next 12 months.

The poll has a credibility interval, a measure of accuracy, of 5 percentage points for the people who recently got rid of their vehicle or planned to do so in the future.

For a graphic on ditching personal cars for ride sharing, click here

(Reporting By Peter Henderson; Editing by Bernard Orr)

 

Social – VentureBeat

Foursquare data suggests tourism to US is plummeting


Foursquare today released data suggesting international tourism numbers to the United States are in freefall. The data comes from 13 million of Foursquare’s users, spread out over 150 countries, and charts travel patterns from July 2016 through March 2017. According to the charts Foursquare has shown, tourism to the United States took a downward turn around October 2016, and shows little sign of recovery in the intervening months. The data specifies a difference between “business travel” and “leisure travel,” defined by the different places the traveler stopped: Leisure venue visits are defined as stops at the following: casinos, department stores, malls, monuments/landmarks, museums,…

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Pot luck: Hound Labs raises $8.1 million to combat stoned drivers with cannabis breathalyzers


Law enforcement agencies have been using breathalyzers to test motorists’ sobriety for decades, but a new startup is staking a claim to bring its cannabis version of the technology to market.

So far, the only reliable ways to test for cannabis use have been through saliva, blood, or urine, which aren’t always practical in a roadside setting. But more than that, Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is known to remain detectable in the system long after a user would be impaired from its use. This is why Hound Labs is developing its breathalyzer, given that THC is detectable in the breath for only a few hours after marijuana use.

Oakland-based cannabis breathalyzer startup Hound Labs is today announcing an $ 8.1 million funding round led by Benchmark, the renowned Silicon Valley VC firm that has made early-stage investments in a number of notable startups, including eBay, Uber, Dropbox, Snapchat, Twitter, and Instagram. So Hound Labs, it’s fair to say, is in good company.

Hound Labs field-tested its Hound breathalyzer with law enforcement in California last year, and clinical trials started this month at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). The company plans to begin manufacturing a market-ready device later this year.

“Over the past two and a half years, we have extensively tested our device with marijuana users and routinely correlated our results with state-of- the-art forensic laboratory equipment,” explained Hound Labs CEO Dr. Mike Lynn. “We are eager to demonstrate the Hound marijuana breathalyzer’s capabilities and to take the final steps toward commercial availability.”

The Hound breathalyzer is touted as being portable, as well as highly accurate, which means it could be used by police roadside or by employers in a place of work where drug-testing is standard.

Though the device is similar in look and feel to an alcohol breathalyzer, the Hound has to be more sensitive to detect THC — it claims to measure THC molecules in parts-per-trillion, as opposed to the parts-per-thousand measurement standard with alcohol.

Above: Hound Labs’ cannabis breathalyzer

 

Since the legal floodgates to sell cannabis have opened in several U.S. states, the fledgling weed industry has been gaining momentum. Indeed, a number of VC firms have plowed cash into marijuana startups — DCM Ventuers, Tusk Ventures, and 500 Startups are among the firms that have invested in medical marijuana delivery firm Eaze.

Elsewhere, Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund took a minority stake in Privateer Holdings, a Seattle-based company behind weed startup Leafly.com.

But while some VC firms have been investing in technology startups that enable cannabis intake, Benchmark is looking to tackle things from the other side. With as many as 55 million Americans reportedly using marijuana to some degree, Hound sees an opportunity to take on the problem of stoned drivers.

“Cannabis legalization has created a new global market for employee and law enforcement testing,” stated Benchmark general partner Mitch Lasky, who will also join Hound Labs’ board of directors. “In the past, employers and law enforcement professionals focused on possession and use. After legalization, impairment — whether behind the wheel or on the job — becomes the new enforcement paradigm. Groundbreaking science is necessary to make an accurate measurement of recently used cannabis, and Hound Labs is uniquely positioned to deliver a solution to the market that respects the needs of the enforcement community as well as the rights of legitimate cannabis users.”

In addition to the clinical trials that have kicked off in San Francisco, Hound Labs said that it will continue carrying out field studies with law enforcement agencies across the U.S.

Today’s funding takes Hound Labs total cash injection past the $ 14 million mark.

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Social – VentureBeat

Feast It lets you book ‘street food’-styled catering for your next corporate or social event

 London-based Feast It, an online marketplace that lets you book ‘street food’-styled catering for your work or social event, has picked up $ 440,000 in seed funding. Read More
Fundings & Exits – TechCrunch

Build electronics projects great and small with the SainSmart UNO for Arduino, for under $55


Understanding how electronics actually work can be pretty confusing. Often, inquisitive students succeed or fail in creating small electronic projects by simple trial and error. Thankfully, you can offer some structure to your pursuit of electronics knowledge with the SainSmart UNO for Arduino microcontroller board. It’s on sale right now for only $ 53.99 (19 percent off) from TNW Deals. This powerful board is the “sandbox” for inventive tinkerers to create their own electronics projects — then bring them to life. Powered by the open-source versatility and extensive library of Arduino, you can use the SainSmart UNO to build handfuls of simple electronic…

This story continues at The Next Web


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9 of the Biggest Google I/O Keynote Announcements

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Each year, bonafide tech geeks and enthusiasts gather or tune in for one of the biggest events of the year: Google I/O, the search giant’s annual developer conference.

It’s a learning opportunity for many, with sessions and talks creating what Google describes as “an immersive experience focused on exploring the next generation of tech.”

But it’s the annual opening keynote that really has everyone paying the most attention. That’s when the company’s leadership, from the CEO to various VPs, unveils and describes the newest technologies, devices, and product features released by Google. For even more Google tips, download our free guide here.

If you missed this year’s opening keynote, fear not: We’ve got you covered with the nine biggest announcements from it. And each month, we’ll continue to bring you a digest of what big Google news you may have missed. So read on — and stay tuned.

What You Missed From the Google I/O Opening Keynote

1) Google Lens

Anyone else remember this video from July 2015?

As “La Bamba” plays in the background, mobile device cameras hover over various words that are then translated into another language. It was a preview of something huge — something that’s finally come to fruition: Google Lens.

There are those moments when you see something that you don’t recognize — like a bird or plant, or perhaps a new cafe somewhere — but can’t identify specifically what it is. Now, with Google Lens, all you have to do is point your camera at it to get the details you want. Check out this super short video to see how that works with a storefront:

Source: Google

But it doesn’t stop with plant species and restaurant information. With this technology, you can also join a home WiFi network by hovering the camera over the name and password. From there, you’ll be prompted with the option to automatically connect.

According to TechCrunch, Lens will be integrated with Google Assistant — “users will be able to launch Lens and insert a photo into the conversation with the Assistant, where it can process the data the photo contains.” That’s a pretty concise summary of what the Lens technology is able to do: understand what a photo means. During the keynote, Google’s VP of Engineering, Scott Huffman, used the example of being able to add concert information to your calendar by taking a Lens photo of the marquee.

google-io-2017-0141.jpg Source: TechCrunch

2) Google for Jobs

google-io-2017-0362.jpg Source: TechCrunch

Anyone who’s ever undertaken a job search knows that there’s an overwhelming number of outlets where openings are listed. “Wouldn’t it be nice,” many job seekers asked, “if all of this information were readily available in one, central place?”

Ask, and ye shall receive. Google set out to synthesize job listings from a number of posting sites — as it’s wont to do, after all — and display it within search results. From there, writes Jessica Guynn for USA Today, “job hunters will be able to explore the listings across experience and wage levels by industry, category and location, refining these searches to find full or part-time roles or accessibility to public transportation.”

Google for Jobs addresses “the challenge,” said Google CEO Sundar Pichai during the keynote, “of connecting job seekers to better information on job availability.” It helps to make the application process that much more seamless, by pulling listings from both third-party boards and employers, and sending users who find a listing that interests them directly to the site where they can apply for it.

3) Google.ai

Screen Shot 2017-05-18 at 9.39.34 AM.png Source: Google

Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of those inevitably cool areas of technology that’s talked about by many, but thoroughly understood by — or available to — few. That was part of the motivation behind the launch of Google.ai, or what TechCrunch describes as an “initiative to democratize the benefits of the latest in machine learning research.”

In a way, the site serves as a centralized resource for much of Google’s work in the realm of AI, from news and documentation on its latest projects and research, to opportunities to “play with” some of the experimental technology. Much like the open source software TensorFlow, which allows aspiring AI developers to create new applications, a major point of Google.ai is open access to the documentation that helps professionals from a variety of industries — like medicine and education — use AI to improve the work they do.

4) Google Assistant Is Coming to the iPhone

Some of the features announced during the I/O opening keynote either require or are heavily enhanced by Google Assistant — technology that previously wasn’t available to iPhone users. Now, that’s all changed. Google Assistant is, in fact, at the disposal of iPhone users, and available for download in the iTunes store.

Many are comparing the iOS version of Google Assistant to a slightly better, but underwhelming version of Siri. We took it for a spin, and here’s how it went:

Not bad, but it might also require a bit more tinkering with to discover all of the features. Its biggest advantage over Siri, writes Romain Dillet for TechCrunch, is its ability to let users “ask more complicated queries,” as well as its third-party integrations and connected device control capabilities.

5) New Google Home Features

screen-shot-2017-05-17-at-10-40-09-am.png Source: CNET

A number of new features available on Google Home were also unveiled during the I/O opening keynote — here are the ones that stood out.

Hands-free calling

Recently, it was announced that the Google Home had new voice recognition capabilities that could distinguish one user’s commands from another. That technology is now aiding its new hands-free calling feature, which allows you to call any U.S. or Canadian landline or mobile phone, by linking your mobile phone to your Google Home profile and asking the device to make the call. And, because of that voice recognition, it knows whose mother to call with the command, “Call Mom.”

Proactive Assistance

Like the best human personal assistance, Google Home can now proactively bring important things to your attention, without having to be asked. For example, if your next meeting requires a commute and traffic is bad, the device will suggest leaving a bit earlier. (Google Calendar users might recognize this feature from the more primitive “leave at X:00 to arrive on time” mobile alerts.)

Visual Responses

They say that “a picture is worth a thousand words” — because sometimes, information is better explained visually than verbally. Now, Google Home can do that, by redirecting a visual response to your mobile device or TV (via Chromecast). So if you ask the device for directions, for example, they’ll be sent directly to your phone.

6) Android O

Android O is a new version of the Android operating system which, while nothing too fancy, “focuses mostly on the nuts and bolts of making the software work better, faster and save battery,” according to CNET.

The publication does a nice job of breaking down the most important features of the new operating system, but to us, there’s one major highlight: picture-in-picture. We’ve all had those moments when we’re watching a video on YouTube and realize that there’s something else you’re supposed to be doing. Now, with Android O, instead of having to exit out of the app, just press the home button and the video will collapse into a smaller, movable window, but continue playing while you attend to the other task you have to complete.

7) From GPS to VPS

When you’re lost, or can’t figure out how to get somewhere, GPS has been there to save dozens of us. But what about misplaced objects — like when we’ve misplaced our keys, headphones, or sunglasses?

Now, there’s technology for that: the Visual Positioning Service, or VPS. Using Google’s Tango augmented reality (AR) platform, it’s a “mapping system that uses augmented reality on phones and tablets to help navigate indoor locations,” writes Raymond Wong for Mashable, using the example of holding up a Tango-enabled phone in a large warehouse store to locate a specific product.

One of the best parts of the VPS, Google noted, is its potential use to individuals who are visually impaired to help them find their way around places that are historically difficult to navigate.

8) Smart Replies Come to Gmail

When we return from vacation, one of the most daunting tasks is sifting through and responding to the deluge of emails that came in while we were out. Of course, there’s always the option of indicating to senders via auto-response that you’ll be deleting everything when you come back. But for those occasional urgent emails that arrive during our time of leave, many of us long for a more automated way to address them.

Now, there’s Smart Reply for that: a new Gmail feature that uses smart technology to suggests quick responses based on the text of the email you received. Here’s a look at how it works:

Smart_Reply_in_Gmail_Pixel_Gray_background.gif Source: Google

Right now, it’s only available in Inbox by Gmail and Allo, but according to Google’s official blog, the technology is slated to “roll out globally on Android and iOS in English first, and Spanish will follow in the coming weeks.”

9) Standalone VR Headsets

Google is no stranger to the world of VR. It started with Cardboard, some might say, and expanded into more advanced and expensive headsets. Now, in partnership with HTC and Lenovo, Google is developing its first standalone VR headset.

What does that mean, exactly? Previously, becoming fully immersed in Google’s VR experiences required the power of a computer or smartphone. Now, using something called WorldSense technology, these new standalone headsets can “track your precise movements in space,” according to VRScout, “without any external sensors to install.”

Until Next Time

We’ll be keeping an eye on all things Google, including the rest of the big announcements from I/O 2017. Next month, we’ll bring you those top news items, algorithm updates, and other trends that can aid your marketing.

Until then, enjoy those May flowers — we’ll see you in June.

Which I/O announcements are you most excited about? Let us know in the comments.

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7 Design Podcasts That’ll Get the Creative Juices Flowing

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If you’ve worked among designers, or are one yourself, there’s something that’s quickly observed: Designers, it seems, are often working with their headphones on.

Much of the time, that’s the result of creative work presenting an opportunity to plug in, and tune out distractions. Whether it helps you focus, or you’re signaling to colleagues that you don’t want to be bothered, or you just think headphones look cool, many creative professionals appreciate a little welcomed background noise.

But what’s everyone listening to? And could that auditory activity serve as a learning opportunity? 

While listening to music on the job has been known to improve workplace performance, podcasts serve as a great way for graphic designers — and many other creative professionals — to both learn something new and get inspired as they work. But there are dozens of podcasts out there, even on design alone. So to save you some of the trouble of previewing every show, we’ve collected a list of 10 interesting design podcasts that you can start listening to, right now.

7 of the Best Podcasts for Graphic Designers

1) Design Matters With Debbie Millman

iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters was, according to Debbie Millman’s website, the “world’s first podcast” dedicated to design. With 281 episodes available at the time of writing this post, there’s no shortage of inspiring insights to be extracted from interviews with artists from every point on the creative spectrum.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You usually listen to music while you’re working, but want to learn something from a podcast instead.
  • You’re curious about the intersection of design and business.

2) 99% Invisible

iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

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Serving as a “weekly exploration of the process and power of design and architecture,” podcast episodes from 99% Invisible don’t just scratch the surface of a dozen topics in a limited time frame. Instead, host Roman Mars uses each installation as an opportunity to dive head-first into one, single unconventional topic. Think: how the design of electricity grids, nature documentaries, and shipping containers work.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You’re the type of person who observes design everywhere — whether it’s during your commute or while staring at a row of condiments.
  • You want to know how every corner of design — including architecture and engineering — influence marketing aesthetics.

3) Adventures in Design

iTunes | libsyn | SoundCloud

adventures in design

“As a department of one,” writes one iTunes reviewer of Adventures in Design, “it’s nice to hear others ‘talk shop’ and not censor themselves.” 

Launched in 2013, this podcast is one that focuses on the projects, process, and inspirational ramblings of its talented guests — from logo design, to the struggles of finding and working with clients. And those guests? Well, they’ve ranged from hockey legends to the global creative director of an international athletic apparel brand.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You feel a bit isolated in your design work, and want insights from the folks who get you.
  • You work with a variety of clients and want to gain inspiration from a number of industries.

4) The Deeply Graphic DesignCast

iTunes

Deeply Graphic DesignCast

When it comes to tangible, immediately applicable advice, the Deeply Graphic DesignCast is a go-to resource for many creative professionals. Hosted by no less than six design professionals, the content comes with a diverse set of insights from each one’s real-world experience. That makes sense — it’s the product of web consulting agency The Deep End. Judging from the broad array of episode topics, from working with subcontractors to designing a mood board, these folks have seen it all … and, they’re sharing it with the world.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You could stand to hear some expertise from client-facing designers.
  • You work in an agency setting and want to hear from like-minded professionals.

5) The Accidental Creative

iTunes | Stitcher

Accidental Creative

One of the coolest things about The Accidental Creative is that it seems to have come about, well, by accident. It’s the product of (and hosted by) author Todd Henry — an expert, speaker, and consultant on design, architecture, and other applications of creative work in business. That content is reflected in the podcast itself, with subject matter ranging from productivity tips for creative professionals, to explaining your job to non-designers.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You could use the help of a creative consultant, but can’t quite pay for it yet.
  • You’re great at what you do, but want to know how to be even better.

6) Typeradio

iTunes | Stitcher

Accidental Creative

It’s a bit difficult to classify exactly what Typeradio is about, and it seems that its creators wish to keep it that way. The website and production alike are no-frills, and it appears to be recorded all over the place: Moscow, Amsterdam, and via Skype, to name a few.

Each episode seems to explore different issues experienced by designers around the world, from their work, to their interpersonal relationships at work and at home — the September 2016 episode with graphic and type designer Ilya Ruderman explores everything between his “first typographic memory,” and how his relationship with his wife influences both his routine and creative work.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You want to listen to something that, as one iTunes reviewer put it, “Often revelatory. Sometimes silly and irreverent. Usually very entertaining.”
  • You’re looking for audible design content that’s profoundly unpretentious.

7) Design Story

iTunes | Stitcher | SoundCloud

Design Story

Does it sometimes seem like B2C designers get to have all the fun? It doesn’t have to be that way — we know that B2B design can be just as exciting, and that both categories can draw ideas from each other.

That’s why we love Design Story — the monthly podcast from Fulcrum, an agency that helps clients align their business policies and creative goals. And that’s what each episode does, by exploring and sharing the stories behind the point where design intersects with things that we traditionally see as leaving little room for creativity: science and leadership, for example.

Listen to this podcast if:

  • You’re a creative designer who also wants to succeed in business — or a manager who wants to better leverage and embrace creativity.
  • You love both data and good stories, and love it when they’re combined.

Tune In

Got those headphones ready? Good. It’s time to start listening.

One common thread that surfaces among all of these podcasts is their shared relatability. Each one explores the trials and tribulations of people with heavy exposure to design at work and at home, and who want to share how those experiences can benefit other creative professionals.

So, what do you say? Let’s turn up the volume.

What are your favorite design podcasts? Let us know in the comments.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in March 2015 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

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